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1.11.2012

How to Paint Your Kitchen Cabinets (like a pro)

Hello Friends!

I promised a tutorial on how I painted my kitchen cabinets, and I'm making good on it (finally).  I apologize for the delay, but these things take time, right?  (Or maybe I was just trying to forget the experience altogether before reliving it in tutorial-form).

If you're interested in reading about this project in process, you can read about it here and here.  You can see the kitchen reveal here and the full evolution of the kitchen in photos here.

If you're in the Dayton/Cincinnati area, and want a quote for painting your cabinets, contact me.
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UPDATED (January 20, 2014)
More tips and tricks for tackling oak cabinets, including how to hide the grain, and some great go-to paint colors!  Click here for all of the details!

UPDATED (June 24, 2013)
Are you painting oak cabinets?  Take a look at the builder grade transformation I did for a client here.

UPDATED (June 11, 2014)
Are you concerned about prepping your cabinets?  Are they unfinished or previously painted?  Check out this post on 5 Cabinet Painting Problems Solved.
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I apologize in advance on the length of this post, but I wanted to make sure I covered everything in one fell swoop.  That said, I'm sure I forgot something, so feel free to ask any questions you may have.

I did a great deal of planning and research before tackling this project, and I hope you're able to learn from my obsessive-compulsive tendencies.

First things first.  These are some of the most important things to know and consider before taking on a project like this.

1.  Unless you have hired help (or a household that will take on all of your responsibilities while working on this), the rest of your house will suffer during this process.
Ok, maybe I'm being a bit dramatic here, but this was my personal experience.  However, I should preface this by also mentioning that I work full-time (outside of the home), and spent just about every non-working moment on this project in order to get it done.  So, for me, this meant that my typical laundry "pile" turned into a laundry "mountain".  The entire house was a wreck, and the hubby and kids had to fend for themselves for the 2-3 weeks that I spent focused on painting.  My kids may or may not have eaten cereal out of the box for dinner several nights in a row.

2.  Invest in help from the experts.
I had three big questions in researching this project:
  • How do I best prep my cabinets for painting?
  • What kind of paint do I use?
  • How do a I choose a paint color?
I looked at a lot of different kitchen cabinet projects online, which was helpful, but I urge you to talk to the pros at your local paint store.  I'm not talking about the teenager that is working at Lowe's.  I went to a paint store where the guys working there knew their stuff.  I brought in one of my cabinet doors and they could tell me immediately what kind of prep work I needed to do and the best paint to do the job.

I also went to a builder's supply center and looked at different cabinet finishes to find the color/finish I wanted to have in my own home.  I took cabinet samples home and decided on colors based on those samples.  The awesome guys at the paint store did a color match on the samples, and I'm thrilled with the result.

Here are the samples I used and had color matched for the island and the kitchen cabinets.
3.  What is the best method to get the job done and make it look professional?
I know there are a lot of opinions and methods out there, but after painting the kitchen island, (using a sprayer for the doors, and hand painting the frame), I knew that painting the cabinets with a brush would not produce the look that I wanted.  Everyone is different, but my cabinets have a lot of raised panels and nooks and crannies, just screaming for drips and brush marks, despite my best efforts.  

The clincher for me was seeing this video of someone painting kitchen cabinets with an HVLP sprayer.  HVLP = High Volume, Low Pressure.  It is a dream for a project like this since you have so much control over the spray in terms of volume and area.  You can dial it down to a targeted, narrow spray for corners and small areas, or you can open it up to give you a much broader spray as well.  I didn't buy the sprayer in the video, but the seed was planted.  I knew this was the way to go (for me).

However, these paint guns can be expensive, since they hook up to a turbine.  But, I did some (more) research, and found one that I could hook up to our air compressor (ours is a 6 gallon 150psi, which was more than enough power) for a fraction of the cost.  Enter Gleempaint.com and this Wagner HVLP Conversion Gun of Awesomeness.*  
(*I don't get paid for recommending this spray gun, nor is it called a Gun of Awesomeness.  I just think it is.)

So, let's get to the details.  How did I prep my cabinets?  What kind of paint did I use?  What finish did I choose?

Paint Prep
Since my cabinets didn't have a glossy finish on the to begin with, I started by giving them a light sanding, and then used Krud Kutter Gloss-Off, which is a great all-in-one cleaner AND deglosser.  So, you can kill two birds with one stone with this product. 

You can see the primer and paint that I used here as well.  Fresh Start Superior Primer and Advance paint by Benjamin Moore.  Again, I'm going on the advice of the experts here (he recommended a different primer for glossy surfaces, but I can't remember what).  I cannot say enough good things about this Advance paint.  Oh. my. goodness.  The paint store guy/expert said, "It's revolutionary."  He said that it's basically an oil-based paint that acts like a latex (even though it is a latex paint).  You get all of the good points of an oil-based paint, with none of the negative.  It hardens like an oil, wears like an oil, but cleans up like a latex and it doesn't smell like an oil!  See?  Revolutionary.

But, before you can get moving with your actual priming/painting, you need to remove your cabinet doors and drawers.  I highly recommend putting together some sort of numbering system so that you don't lose track of what goes where.  While it all seems to make sense when you're planning, trust me that you will be glad you did this when your paint-weary brain goes to put the doors and drawers back.

TIP:  I started out my labeling like this, but ended up putting the post-it notes INSIDE the cabinet door and drawer frames and taping the number (with a little description) with painter's tape on the actual door/drawer.  The description came in handy - i.e., left bottom, right of stove.  Just trust me on this.


Below, my cabinet coding translates to - Right of stove, cabinet #28, right bottom (RB).  Believe me, when you're exhausted and swimming in a Sea of Cabinets that need to be put back in their proper place, you'll be thankful for this little extra help.
You will also need to tape off the insides of the cabinets, the countertops, floor, even some of the ceiling.  If you're planning on painting the walls, do it after you paint the cabinets - you'll save some time and trouble in taping off the walls in addition to everything else.  This was, by far, my least favorite part of this project.  Taping off the insides of cabinet frames is harder than it sounds.  But, I can offer you some advice that I learned along the way.  

TIP:  Tape off the bottom, sides and top of the frame first (newspaper works well for this), and then tape off the back of the inside frame.   

You can see what I mean here:
Versus here where I was trying to tape off right at the edge of the inside frames.  Don't ask me why it took me so long to figure this out, but it was a maddening process.  (And don't mind the water spot on the contractor paper - it's from the water dispenser in the fridge.  I swear.)
TIP:  When you take off your cabinet hinges, put them in Ziploc baggies and tape them to the inside frame of that cabinet.  This makes rehanging much simpler! 

You will need to go all Dexter-like and tape off any open areas in your kitchen to avoid spray particles from floating through your house.
And really, if you want to paint the frames with a brush, you could do that and save some of the trouble.  But, since my frames had a lot of raised panels, I wanted the clean look that the HVLP sprayer provides, and it was worth the extra prep work.

You will also need to set up a staging area and a "spray booth" for painting your cabinet doors and drawers.  If it's warm enough, you can do this in your garage.  I ended up setting up shop in our basement storage area.  The great part about this space is that there are doors that lead to the outside, so I could open them up for ventilation.  Plus, it gave me room to create my little spray booth and space to let my cabinets dry.
You can see that I have a little table set up here, with a piece of MDF (that is actually a large storage shelf).  I nailed five finish nails on this board so that I could easily maneuver around the cabinet door to paint and not worry about the door sticking to anything when I had to move it.  The same holds true for the area outside of my spray booth, where the cabinets were set to dry.  Since I was painting both the front and the back of my cabinets, I wanted to keep the drips to a minimum, as well as the possibility of them sticking to anything while drying, and the nails allowed for this.
Note:  I obviously removed the hardware before doing this, and also used Elmer's wood putty in one of the holes since I was going with knobs vs. pulls on the cabinet doors.  Make sure you plan out the placement of your knobs and pulls before you start painting, to avoid wasting time at the end of the process making adjustments that would require more priming and painting.

Now the fun begins!  Priming and painting!

Before you begin spraying your cabinets, practice on a large piece of cardboard or an old box so that you can get the hang of the spray gun and figure out how to best adjust the settings.  It's really very simple to use and I promise you that it doesn't take long to get the hang of using it. 

You can easily control the flow of the paint, direction and diameter of the spray and the amount of air pressure as you go along.  It just takes some experimenting to get used to it.  This was my first time using it, and you saw my results!

Some diagrams from gleempaint.com to help explain what I'm talking about here (and again, I'm NOT getting paid!)

Paint spray patterns:
www.gleempaint.com
 Paint pattern size:
www.gleempaint.com
 Air and paint flow control:
gleempaint.com
TIP:  If you're going to paint both sides of your cabinet doors, start by painting the inside of the cabinet first.  That way, if you make any mistakes or have problems, you'll learn early and it will be on an inconspicuous part of the cabinet.  Plus, this way the cabinets will end up drying with the outside of the cabinet facing UP, and you don't have to worry about any potential scratches or indentations from the nails that are used to balance your cabinets for drying.  You will have a freshly painted cabinet surface when you rehang your doors.

Start by priming the outside edge of the door with a narrow spray, making sure that you cover the outside edges of the door.  
 Then, fill in the center area, ensuring complete coverage.
Carefully pick up the door and move it to the drying area.  Lather. Rinse. Repeat. ;-)
Once you get into a rhythm, you can blow through the doors relatively quickly.  The priming probably took the longest, because I only used one coat of primer and wanted to be sure I covered the doors really well.  I followed the primer with two coats of paint.  Once you get started, it's a hurry up and wait kind of process.   For the primer, I gave it a good 24 hours to dry for each side.  For the paint, it's a 16 hour wait time in between coats, which essentially amounts to a whole day for each coat.  For each side.  

TIP:  Clean your HVLP spray gun after you're done for the day.  It's really easy, so don't be intimidated!  All I had to do was empty the paint out of the spray cup, fill it with warm water, and spray it out until the water ran clear.  (Of course, instructions are provided with the spray gun).  Also, you don't need to clean the needle every time, as indicated in the directions.  That is something that needs to be done more occasionally (I read this on the gleempaint.com website).

So, do the math.  Two sides, one coat of primer, two coats of paint.  You're talking about at least week of just painting and waiting.  Then you want to let them sit and cure a bit before you rehang them.  I recommend 2-3 days of cure time once you have completed all of the priming and painting. 

While your doors are curing you can tackle the frames (or at least that's what I did).  I saved this piece for last, because this is what rendered my kitchen pretty much inoperable since you're taping EVERYTHING off in order to get a clean spray of just the frames.  The same process holds for the frames also:
  • Lightly sand the frames (I used 220 grit sandpaper)
  • Remove excess dust and wipe clean with tack cloth
  • Clean and degloss the frame surface with Krud Kutter
  • Prime cabinet frames and allow to dry 24 hours
  • Lightly sand and use tack cloth before painting
  • Paint cabinet frames with 2-3 coats of paint, waiting 24 hours in between coats
  • Wait 2-3 days for paint to cure before rehanging doors
TIP:  Since gravity is working against you on the cabinet frames, I recommend using a fine spray so that you avoid drips as much as possible.  If you do get drips, the paint experts told me to avoid sanding too much in between because the paint can gum up since it's not cured.  If you have drips, you might want to wait until it's fully cured and then sand, as it will be more "sand-friendly".  You can touch up with a small artist's brush.

The paint experts told me that it takes 30 days for the Advance paint to fully cure.  Don't panic - it's not like you're going to be working with sticky cabinet doors or anything.  Just use a little extra caution in the first month.

Once your doors and frames have cured enough to reassemble your kitchen, the fun part of putting your kitchen back together begins!  From here, you can install new hardware if you have it, reinstall your hinges (or replace your old ones with new), and then rehang your doors and drawers.

If you're installing new hardware and need help on where to place it, pick up one of these handy little tools to save you some time and headache:
Amazon.com
Now, sit back and enjoy your new kitchen! 





I hope you found this tutorial helpful, and most importantly, I hope you'll begin to see that you can do this project!

In case you missed it - here is my post from January 2014 with tips and tricks on painting oak cabinets.

In April 2014, I gave Behlen's Grain Filler a test drive to get rid of the oak grain on a cabinet project.

Here is a post showing an oak kitchen transformed (by me) for a client.

Before:

After:


I think I'm the fifth person in as many days to post cabinet painting tutorials!  Here are some links to some other resources that might be useful:

Melissa at 320 Sycamore
Traci at Beneath my Heart
Sherry and John at Young House Love
Marian at Miss Mustard Seed
Traditional Painter Hand Painted Kitchens and Furniture - a treasure trove of information from seasoned pros, on materials, supplies, prep and technique, along with loads of photos of kitchen transformations.  One of my favorite resources!

Linking up to:
Home Stories A to Z - Tutorials and Tips Link Party
Savvy Southern Style - Wow Us Wednesday

351 comments:

  1. Wow! That was a big job to tackle on your own. Good Job! Looks totally professional. Thanks for the great tutorial as I am thinking about painting my kitchen sometime soon.

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  2. Wow, your cabinets turned out beautiful! Thanks for sharing such a wonderful tutorial with all of us! Kim

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  3. Awesome tutorial! I did this last year and wish I'd been able to read this before I started!

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  4. Very thorough tutorial! You are a brave woman! I'm especially impressed because you also have a full-time job. I liked your very first point. Home improvement can disrupt the household a lot but the results are certainly worth it!

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  5. Awesome! I know this was a VERY BIG job but the results are awesome!!

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  6. Jenny-
    Wow!! Your kitchen looks great!! And the tutorial is excellent....I'm going to have to save this post back in case I ever get the "itch" to paint my cabinets!!

    I'm curious about the sprayer you used...cost, etc....I can see how it would be necessary for this major project!!

    Kristal

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  7. Lovely decor and awesome tutorial!!!

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  8. I wish I had the guts to paint my kitchen cabinets, and I have a lot less than you! I think I will have to hire someone, because I would be afraid of how they might turn out if I do it myself. You are truly an inspiration, your cabinets turned out great!

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  9. I didn't do mine like this, but I have been very happy with my results and it's been 5 years now!...BUT, I wanted to post for who ever might happen to read this, that I was unable to replace my handles and hinges because of sizing and I certainly didn't like the antique brass that my 70's kitchen came with...so after a hot bath in Dawn dish soap I pushed EVERY little screw (and there were at least 100 of them) into some old styrofoam and set up a workspace for the handles and hinges and use pewter colored AUTOMOTIVE SPRAY PAINT. Again, I'm happy to report that 5 years later the automotive spray paint has held up to the wear and tear and cleaning that kitchen drawer and cabinet pulls and hinges receive on a daily basis. I figured if the paint was suppose to work on a vehicle that is subject to "life in the out-of-doors", it ought to work on in my kitchen, and it did!

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    1. Fabulous idea, I have nice faucets but they are brass and I'd like to change them to silver, I'm going to try your idea.
      Thanks so much.

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    2. You would be offsetting fixtures because the oils in your skin will wear the paint off! I am a faux finisher who paints a lot of cabinets and it will wear off!

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  10. what a fantastic tutorial! they look amazing :)

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  11. What If any do you think is the benefit of Rustoleums ins cabinet kit. I looks the same as what you did only with a brush and glaze for a wood look on top?

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  12. Good photography and desingn

    which wood do you use for kitchen cabinet ?

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  13. Wow, what a difference and your space looks great! Excellent, thorough directions-you included details that will really make a difference in time and quality-thanks!

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  14. You may have addressed this and Inmissed it, but how far away do you hold the sprayer from the cabinets?

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    1. This really depends on the volume and pressure settings you're using. If you have the paint very fine and focused, you can get pretty close. With higher pressure and spray, you take it out a bit further. Once you get used to the spray gun, you figure it out pretty quickly.

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  15. I love how your cabinets turned out; they're beautiful.

    I'm curious about the sprayer--I've read some reviews on other sprayers before and people complain about the overspray. Did you find that to be the case with this one? I would like to set up shop in our basement like you did, but although it's unfinished, I would still be a little nervous to get paint everywhere. Were you able to keep that to a minimum?

    You've breathed new life into my motivation to get going on our kitchen, and have pretty much convinced me to buy that sprayer!!

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  16. I'm also interested in knowing how many gallons of primer and paint you used for your kitchen? Our kitchen is not nearly as large as yours, but we're trying to estimate supplies/expenses and it would be helpful to have an idea of how much paint you went through!

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  17. Great job. I admire all your hard work. Just the work posting makes me tired and you were great to share all your knowledge. Truly looks professional.

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  18. Great tutorial and great results! I can't wait to try this Advance paint...and sprayer! Did you thin your paint before spraying it?

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  19. I tried straining the paint a couple of times, but found that it didn't make a difference. The paint store experts told me that thinning wasn't necessary either. I cannot say enough good things about the Advance paint either - AMAZING.

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  20. Wow! I am so impressed! Awesome job! I painted my kitchen cabinets last summer, did all the research online, and have regrets of not using a spray gun! Instead I used a foam roller for facings of cabinets, and a foam roller & a paint brush for doors. I have streaks from brush, runs,and rippling orange peel effect marks from roller. Also regrets of using Latex 100% acrylic paint. It's chipping!After 5 weekends of work! I felt like you! It consumed me, and the house was a disaster, and we ate taco bell every night!lol. Now I am going to attempt to redo it in May! Your tutorial has encouraged me! Your cabinets looks so professional and brand new! I will also be purchasing my paint from Benjamin Moore! Thanks so much!

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  21. Very detailed tutorial. i'm very impressed with all your information. the kitchen looks great. i'm luck to be a good friend and have seen the cabinets in person. they look like they have always been white. you would NEVER know she painted them. They are amazing. Great Job, Jen! vanessa

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  22. I can't believe you did these yourself. They look fantastic and that is a great tutorial. I know you are so proud of the outcome. Thanks for sharing at Wow.

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  23. You did an awesome job! We had ours done and it was the best $1500 we've spent! So worth it. I just don't have the patience to DIY.

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  24. this is a great tutorial. I have been wanting to do this for years! Thanks for taking the time to give us the step by step. Can I ask what color paint you used in your kitchen? I LOVE it!

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    1. I had the paint color custom mixed based upon the cabinet sample that I got from a building supply store. I couldn't be happier with it.

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  25. Thanks for compiling this time consuming tutorial . . . albeit less time consuming than refacing the cabinets. They look great and I especially love the contrasting island. Great colors!

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  26. I used the Rustoleum cabinet transformation kit. Talked to the guy at Home Depot about it - we wondered if it was just a convenient packaging of the components and from what you did it seems like yes. They have lots of colors and it turned out great. It didn't call for a sanding stage - and I should have in some areas because the cabinets had been painted prior to my foray and there were drips. If you are going over cabinets that have original finish (like when I did the bathroom cabinets) the results are AMAZING. Colors on the chart are very true to color. I dabbled with the spray gun - think I used more paint because of it. I liked the smooth finish I got with a super smooth roller - the mini ones worked great. I did have to watch on the final top coat and rinse the roller often or I got slightly foamy bubbles for some reason. Been up for close to a year and holding up well! Definitely a project but saved a boatload of money.

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  27. These look great! My problem is that I have metal cabinets. Even Rustoleum seems to chip and peel. Anyone have any ideas?

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    1. I would try Automotive Spray Paint. It's meant for metal.

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    2. Some of the newer metal spray paints hold up well. I used the hammered silver on a GOLD vanity light & it looks awesome. I had several people ask where I bought my light lol. Of course it doesn't get the "handling" that cabinet doors do but the variation of color with it may hide some blemishes if you have any on your metal cabinets. Maybe also do a design (like frame it out in the hammered and spray center will a flatter color)...oh well, I could rant on lol.

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  28. oh I do so wish I were on this side of things! I have the paint, just can't quite get myself to take the plunge! You did a fantastic job!!

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  29. Please Help!! What is the name of the paint color by Benjamin Moore that you used on the cabinets?? It's the perfect white!! I'm overwhelmed by looking at white paint color samples.

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    1. The color was color matched based upon the cabinet sample that I had. A great way to get the look that you want, and I'm really happy with the results.

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  30. Thank-you for posting this! It looks amazing! We are in the process of starting this and there are so mnay different opinions and options it was nice to see what you did. I love that you took the time with details it paid off! I love your "dexter" reference I laughed out loud! My husband definitly likes the spray idea as he was worried about brush marks too. Thank-you again for letting us see a job well done! It's beautiful!! -Stacy

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  31. Thanks so much for sharing. What a AWESOME job! Love the cabinets but what I would really like to know is what brand/color on your walls? LOVE IT!! Just before starting major project of my own. Thanks

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    1. The wall color is Benjamin Moore's Mountain Laurel. Great color - I love it. :-)

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  32. Best, detailed instructions I've come across! I have a question...did you seal with polyurethane at end? I painted my cabinets a few years ago..white..and didn't seal them and every little spot shows up. Would like to stay white if I knew they would stay clean?! Thanks

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    1. Didn't need to seal with poly at the end - the Benjamin Moore Advance paint holds up excellently all on its own.

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  33. We did our cabinets with new doors! We wanted the antique look and couldn't find anyone willing to take on the job. They couldn't spray in the home and that was how they would do the new doors. Your tip to talk to the paint store was exactly right! They were a wonderful resource! We brushed the paint on and it was very successful! We used a glaze to get the antique look and denatured alcohol if we made a mistake or didn't like the look. It looks so professional, people can't believe we did it ourselves! So don't be afraid of a brush if you are not confident with a sprayer! Your tutorial is wonderful!

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    1. Talking to a true expert is so key in this process, because they really help to answer the tough questions (and the most important questions!) in this whole process. Key to success if you ask me.

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  34. That looks amazing! I know it's only been a couple weeks, but how are they holding up? We did ours three years ago and I have to do "touch ups" all the time. It's annoying. They don't feel like a factory finish. They look roller painted. Wish I had that revolutionary paint back then! :)

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    1. I finished the cabinets back in November (the tutorial was almost as time consuming to complete as the cabinet painting!) and they're holding up beautifully. I can scrub them down and they aren't any worse for the wear. I am over the top thrilled with them, I have to tell you! I should be a Benjamin Moore poster child for their Advance paint, I love it so much. :-)

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  35. Ha ha! I like the "you will have to go Dexter"! It looks good. I hope you enjoy it. :)

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  36. holy crap, girl! now come over asap and paint mine! You're a PRO! Job well done! : )

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  37. Absolutely gorgeous! I have been begging my husband to do this. Now that I've found your tutorial, I can prove that we can do it ourselves! My one question, what about the inside of the cabinets. I know that no one sees them from the outside but I don't want my ugly cabinet color to be seen when I open them. Can I spray the inside with the spray gun? Would that work or be too much? Thanks for sharing!! You are my inspiration!

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    1. Thanks so much Samantha. You CAN do it yourself - it's not difficult, just time-consuming. As for the insides of the cabinets, you could paint those as well, but I would check to see if the inside of your cabinets is a different material than the outside of your cabinet. If there is any sort of laminate or non-wood surface on the insides, you'll have to prime and prep it accordingly, but you can definitely use the spray gun do do them. But, it would certainly save on the time and effort involved in taping them off like I did!! That was probably my least favorite part of the whole project.

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  38. I've been a professional painter for years and use Benjamin Moore exclusively. I've been reluctant to try my kitchen cabinets because they are sure to be labor intensive. Thanks for your excellent tips. I will definatly be tackling this project very soon!

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  39. This kitchen cabinet painting tutorial is awesome! I have a question though. My cabinets are only wood fronts and I would be concerned about painting the sides where the "paper" is peeling. Any tips?

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  40. Were your kitchen cabinets real wood? Mine are the cheaper kind. They are outdated and need some revamping. Buying new cabinets would be too expensive.

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  41. Did you thin out your paint before you put it in the paint gun?

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  42. Your tutorial was wonderful! I'm in the middle of doing the same thing, except my kitchen is much smaller and I have fewer doors to paint. I too went to the paint store and got the same advise from my BMoore dealer....glad you confirmed. I've done this before only in oil based paint and I hope this will be my last attempt to make my kitchen look great. Thanks for your valued opinion. You did a wonderful job!!!

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  43. Beautiful transformation! What was the original paint color on your walls before you repainted them? (if you know!)

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  44. We were given kitchen cabinets from a friend who was redoing their's. We will be installing them in a kitchen at our cottage. Thanks for the thorough tutorial. I will definately not be so intimidated to go ahead with this project. Well done!

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  45. Just had to let you know this is a remarkably thorough post! I started painting our cupboards 3 years ago, got the bottom ones done and never have mustered up the energy to do the top ones (it took a lot of energy)! Your kitchen looks amazing! Well Done! Want to come over and finish mine now?

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  46. Well now I REALLY want to paint my cabinets white ;) You might be hearing some words from my hubby about this post. Hee hee! Great job and a great tutorial! You really gave a good step by step. Also, the end result is PRETTY!! :)

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  47. What a beautiful kitchen and a FANTASTIC tutorial! I'm pinning you!

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  48. How did you do the panels on your refrigerator?

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  49. You have inspired me to tackle my kitchen!

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  50. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  51. Hi Jenny

    Great job! I am a professional automotive painter but have been a bit reluctant to tackle this project in my home. I too am very picky as to how I do things. This definitely takes time and work to achieve results like yours. I have been doing research for 2 days and like your ideas the best. The prep work is 90% of a successful job but the right materials make all of the hard work come together. Many tutorials are sketchy on the "how - to's" and give no advice about the products used. I have confidence that you have made great suggestions here. THANKS for that.

    I will be going to my local Benjamin Moore store this week to select my paint. This has been my major concern. Quality materials that are easy to use. Your colors are very appealing BTW.

    For your readers; spraying in my opinion is the best way to achieve a beautiful finish. Do not be hesitant, anyone can do this! As Jenny suggested... just a few minutes of practice on and old board or cardboard will do. Start with a very low volume of paint and slowly work your way up to a comfortable level. You will be thrilled with the end results.

    This is an excellent tutorial, Jenny has given you all the info you need for a fantastic transformation!

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  52. Thank you for such an incredibly detailed tutorial! I am planning on painting my almost 20 year old golden oak cabinets and your tutorial gives me the confidence to do it!! Awesome job on your kitchen, it is absolutely beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Susan, I hope you're able to put the tutorial to good use. Like I keep telling people - it's not difficult, it just requires time and patience. You can do it!!

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  53. OMG.. THAT is AMAZING!!!! Now.. I just need a house... :) (I bookmarked for when i do!!)

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  54. Hi, love your kitchen!!!!!!!!! Great job. What color are your walls???!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! The walls are Mountain Laurel by Benjamin Moore. I love this color so much that I used my extra paint to paint my downstairs bathroom. :-).
      www.evolutionofstyleblog.blogspot.com/2012/01/powder-room-palooza.html

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  55. WOW. Did you do this all by yourself? You are truly an admirable woman. I will use this post to help me as I redo my own kitchen cabinets. Thank you!

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  56. Your kitchen looks really nice. I was looking at the paint spray gun you used and it reminded me of when I worked at a chocolate factory. We used to use one that we filled with whited chocolate and we would spray the hazelnut seashell molds, then give it a coating of milk chocolate. We would then give it a coating of milk chocolate and then fill with hazelnut filling. The paint gun also came in handy when coating almonds and coffee beans with chocolate, in the big tumbler. Those paint guns are really fun to use and they are easy to clean, but maybe not if all the paint dried overnight in the hoses.

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  57. oh my! I just read yr tutorial and I am not even thinking of doing this! You should be a writer! You must have patience and a lot of energy! Fantastic job! Love the whole look...from "new" cabinets to wall colors, counter tops, pulls, etc.! You definitely have a couple talents!

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  58. I forgot to ask what color you used for the cabinets? Your blog has really helped us. We will be starting our cabinets soon!!!!

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    Replies
    1. We had the paint color matched to the cabinet sample that we liked. Unfortunately, I don't have the "formula", but I highly recommend that approach. I am thrilled with the color.

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  59. Your post came at the perfect time for me! First of all, I am so impressed you did this yourself! Second, your kitchen looks absolutely amazing! I hired a painter who specializes in cabinet finishes and will take all the doors and drawer fronts to his shop to spray. But the boxes in the kitchen will have to be taped off and sprayed onsite.
    I'm procrastinating! The finish will be a 3 or 4 step finish with glazes etc. The whole process seems daunting, but seeing how you did it and lived to tell has given me courage to bite the bullet and just get it done! Thanks for the tutorial! ~Delores

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  60. Awesome job! We want to paint our cabinets white too. We are going to hire a professional who will spray the cabinets at his shop and spray the frames onsites. I am concerned about the oil paint smell and the final appearance. But I just came across the Benjamin Moore Advance paint which none of the contractors mentioned using.
    Couple of questions for you: Did you use the high gloss or satin finish? I'm expecting a smell from the paint but is there truly minimal odor with this paint? How have the cabinets held up? I have relatively new cabinets with raised panels and beading work along the panel.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for your kind words. As for the paint finish, I went with a satin, and they have held up beautifully. And the odor? No comparison to an oil based paint! If anything, I think it was even less smelly than some the latex paints I've used to paint my walls. REVOLUTIONARY I tell you! :-)

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  61. i actually started by staining mine, what a PITA...besides, the frames are particle board, can't stain that. I'll have to try to start this project over with the paint gun and loads of tape/time/room. Looks time consuming, but much easier than what I tried.

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  62. Beautiful! Thanks for taking the time to show us how you did it! I was wondering if you sanded the doors after you primed them?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment - yes, I did lightly sand after priming - 220 grit sandpaper - just enough to smooth out any rroughness.

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  63. This is awesome, thank you! This is exactly hos the pros painted my kitchen cabs. I want to do my bathroom myself.

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  64. What size tip did you use for the advance paint? And did you use the same size for the primer?

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    Replies
    1. I used the standard tip that came with my paint gun - don't quote me, but I think it was a #3?). Used the same tip for both primer and paint.

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    2. Thanks. According to Gleem's website it does come with #3 (which is a 1.3 mm tip). The Advance paint must be much thinner than ordinary latex paint.

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  65. Great Job! Where can I find the spray gun and how much is it? :)

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  66. I'm a professional paint contractor and I think you did a wonderful job! See why we charge so much? It's not easy to spray kitchen cabinets in a finished house! The only thing I can say that may have saved you some time is write the numbers of the cabinets and doors with a marker where the hinges go then cover with a piece of tape. After you finish painting, pull off the tape and reveal the numbers, the hinges will cover them. And it doesn't matter if you mix up the hinges and knobs, just keep them all in a single bowl or bag. I like to wash them before reinstalling them.

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  67. Was your 6 gallon pancake compressor able to keep up? I keep reading that a compressor this size would require a lot of waiting for it to refill. What were your pressure settings at the compressor and gun?

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  68. Hi,Jenny, I am in the process of repainting my old oak kitchen cabinet. After reading many many tutorials I found yours are the best. I finally decide to spray instead brush paint the doors. Just have a couple questions about the primer, do you use oil based or water based primer in a spray gun? Oil based primer needs mineral spirits to clean. I am not sure if it is easy to clean. Another question is how many gallons of paint did you spray? I probably needs a gallon of paint to paint my kitchen by brush, but by spraying, maybe I should buy 2 gallons? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I used the Benjamin Moore Fresh Start Superior Primer (latex), upon the advice of my "paint guy". You can use oil based paint in a spray gun, but like you said, you would have to used mineral spirits to clean.

      As for paint - I ended up buying two gallons of paint, but was *this close* to getting the job done with one gallon. And I had nearly 50 cabinet doors and drawers to paint. I think the sprayer saves on paint actually. As for the primer, I used one gallon of primer.

      Good luck, and I'm glad you found my tutorial helpful. :-)

      Delete
  69. this is amazing one to see and really super article to see.

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  70. So I did my cupbaords with the advanced and fresh start. Did yours actually dry rock hard. Its been two weeks and I can still scratch paint off...is this normal?

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    Replies
    1. My paint guy told me that it takes about 30 days for the paint to fully cure. Mine have held up fine - could it be that they haven't fully cured yet?

      Delete
  71. Thank you so much for all the time and effort you put into your post. Wow! I so wanted to do this, but took the 'easy way out' by scrubbing and polishing up my old cabinets and buying all new hardware to bring them into this century. :) I will definitely pin this, should I absolutely get sick of my red oak look. (I brightened up my kitchen by re-doing the floors and counters with a much lighter tone, and painting the walls a light shade of yellow. And now have white appliances, mine were 25 years+) I have done the 'taping up of the whole area' when I did a 'splatter wall' in my son's room. Props to you girlfriend! This is very time consuming and tedious task, especially in a kitchen - and you with an active family. Yikes! Your kitchen looks great! Your whole family should be VERY proud of you!!

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  72. Was the white a special name or just the standard white? Love the pics!

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    Replies
    1. We custom matched the color to a cabinet sample that I got from a kitchen design store.

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  73. my cabinets are actually formica...I wonder if the same technique will work?

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  74. my cabinets are actually formica...I wonder if the same technique will work?

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  75. Thank you for taking time to share your research and hard work!! You did a wonderful job!!

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  76. Great kitchen! Great Blog! I'm wondering if you wore a mask while spray? safety goggles? Any safety precautions to share?

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I should have mentioned that in my post. I wore goggles and a mask while painting. :-)

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  77. Thanks for sharing this tips http://pinterest.com/stylin/.. It is a big help.. :)

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  78. That is an amazing tutorial and I found you via Pinterest. Of course I had to post a link to. Thanks for sharing

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  79. Great job. What an awesome tip to bring a cabinet sample to the paint store for color matching. I never thought of that. I'm going to buy the Advance paint too when I start my kitchen remodel this Summer. Can you share where you got your kitchen hardware: bin pulls and knobs? They look fab with your white cabinets.

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  80. I would LOVE for you to email me the paint color you have above your cabinets (the blue) as well as the blue you have in your living room. nisha dot riggs at gmail dot com. THANKS!

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  81. Great write up! Wish my "professional" painter had read this before he did my cabinets. I am going to redo them myself and will be sure to prep properly! He didn't even prime first! I went along with it against my better judgement thinking "well he's the professional and knows what he's doing".

    Now I have to sand/strip them back down and start over from scratch :(

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  82. whOa! What a terrific post! I can't thank you enough for sharing all of your work. I'm about to use the Wagner sprayer with the Ben Moore paint on our new kitchen cabinets (unfinished oak).

    One question...did you spray the primer? Ok, two questions :) ...was the paint thin enough to be handled comfortably by the sprayer?

    Thanks! You're awesome.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for your comment. To answer your questions, I did use the spray gun to spray the primer - makes quick work of the process. As for thinning the paint, I didn't have to thin it. I followed the directions and used a paint strainer a few times, but I didn't really notice a difference one way or the other.

      Good luck!

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    2. Hi Jenny, thanks so much for the post! The guys at Gleem Paint ought to give you a kick back for all the business (mine included). We're painting some new doors, and I'm hoping this will look much better than the somewhat streaky look we got with rollering and laying off with the brush. :( Which sheen did you use with BM Advance?

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    3. I used the satin finish in the Benjamin Moore paint. Perfect finish for cabinets if you ask me.

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  83. Your kitchen looks fab! I am in the process of painting my cabinets too & I am wondering what to do to prevent chips that I'm sure are inevitable? Did you use any protectant? I really hate chipped cabinets!!

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    Replies
    1. I haven't had any problems with chipping, really. I didn't use any protectant over the top - the paint has hardened really well. I would recommend to prime very thoroughly and take your time during this step. Especially in the areas that get the most wear. The other recommendation I would offer is when you add the little cabinet door bumpers to the insides of the doors, to make sure they're not too sticky, because they can pull at the paint if you're not careful.

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  84. I found this just in time! Thank you for being so detailed and such a big help! I just finished one bathroom and I'm making my way to the kitchen. You just brightened my thoughts about tackling this job! Thank you!

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  85. Wow! Your finished product looks amazing, awesome, incredible....but I think I threw up in my mouth a little thinking of all the work. Where's that cabinet guy's number?

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  86. Just beautiful, you've done an amazing job :).

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  87. Hey Jenny!

    Beautiful job!!...would you recommend this same process for painting a childs poster bed?...I'm modifying a set of bunk beds into a poster bed and I'd like to paint it for my grand daughters room...

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  88. Great work! Thank you so much for this article. I am currently in the middle of doing the same research and paint testing on old cabinets that I can afford to ruin. I have a couple of questions I was hoping you could answer. Did you end up sanding between each coat? Did you use a protective top-coat such as a varathane finish? I'm assuming you had to use a paint thinner in order to use the sprayer? Did you find that finding the right consistency was challenging?

    Thanks!

    Karrie

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    Replies
    1. I did a light sanding in between coats (220 grit sandpaper), to make sure the surface was smooth. As for a top coat with a finish - there was no need for that with the Advance paint (per my paint guy). I didn't have to thin the paint either. I strained it a few times, but overall, I can't say that it really made all that much of a difference. The paint does extremely well with the spray gun. You could add a shot of Floetrol if you needed to, but I didn't need it.

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    2. Thanks so much for replying so quickly! I really appreciate it.

      Delete
  89. Wow! They look amazing! Great job!

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  90. I am scared to death but I am goint o give this a try lol!!!! THANK YOU for the insight. I am a bit nervous that oak cabinets will still show the grain...any insight :)

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  91. I love your kitchen!! Thank you for all your information! We are in the planning phase of redoing our kitchen cabinets and counter tops. Would you reccommend replacing the counters first or paint the cabinets first?

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    Replies
    1. I would probably CHOOSE your countertops and cabinet paint at the same time if possible, but would install the countertops after painting the cabinets. Then you wouldn't have to worry quite so much about being super precise and careful about taping off the cabinets when you paint. :-)

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  92. Your kitchen looks great! I read several posts about the Rustoleum Cabinet Transformation kit. I will be using this kit on my cabinets and the salesman at Lowes had nothing but positive things to say about it. Our neighbors transformed their cabinets and they look amazing! This task seems so overwhelming but I know it will be worth it in the end..

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  93. Hi Jenny, i found your tutorial on pinterest. And wow, your kitchen looks great!

    Stephanie from germany

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  94. I will be moving soon and will be experiencing the "joy" of painting kitchen cabinets (not!). Your before and after pictures are inspirational. I'm not very imaginative with projects and these types of tutorials are very helpful.
    Thanks! P.S. Love the "Water, not pee" note! :)

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  95. BEAUTIFUL... Where were you when I painted my cabinets....makes me want to redo them AGAIN.. I thought my way was a process....what a detailed tutorial and your kitchen looks amazing.

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  96. Very nice.

    Wagner offers a lot of differnt paint guns... How did you decide on the model you purchased?

    Thanks in advance,

    Brian

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    Replies
    1. I did a lot of research and determined that I wanted an HVLP sprayer, but didn't want to pay the big bucks for one that runs via turbine. This one had great reviews, and it is a great tool for an amazing price.

      Delete
  97. Great job, you done a wonderful job. I want to thank you for the information on how too. I have been wanting to do this myself just didn't know where to start.

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  98. This is so inspiring and I love the look of your cabinets. I AM going to redo mine and this will be a God save for me. Thank you for this wonderful information!!!

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  99. Thank you so much for sharing this! I only hope that mine comes out half as good as yours. By the way, thanks for the mention of Gleem Paints. I've been asking them for much advice and they couldn't be nicer.

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  100. Jenny, thank you for sharing! I have been researching for awhile to find the best way to paint my oak cabinets and your way seems to be the best. My one question is do I need to put wood putty over the grain to keep it from showing, or do you think the primer and paint will take care of hiding the grain? Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. My cabinets were maple, so I didn't have to deal with any issues with the grain. I have read about different ways to work with the grain (putty, filler, etc...), but am hesitant to make a recommendation without personal experience with it.

      Here is a link to the kitchen cabinet paint job that Kristin did on her blog - she had oak cabinets, and it turned out beautifully.

      http://myuncommonsliceofsuburbia.com/how-to-paint-oak-cabinets/

      Delete
  101. I am in the middle of my kitchen cabinet project. I was delayed due to some unexpected ceiling repair (sheetrock replacement, mudding, texture and paint ARGH!). I have one quick question regarding the HVLP sprayer and the Advance paint. I was told that normally you wouldn't use a latex paint in a HVLP sprayer. Is it ok because of it being the latex enamel? I see that the Fresh Start primer is 100% acrylic.

    I'm new to the whole paint gun experience but look forward to giving it a go.

    http://mgreenhaw.blogspot.com/

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    Replies
    1. I didn't have any issues with the Advance paint and the HVLP sprayer, and the instructions didn't put any restrictions on paint either. It goes on like butter, and I really can't say enough positive things about the Advance paint.

      Hope this helps!

      Delete
  102. I watched and read your tutorial two times - you were so thorough, Jenny! I know this is going to be a big project, but I now have a clearer understanding of this project of painting our cabinets. Your idea's and wonderful advice were priceless. Thank you for giving me the idea's and gutts to take this on.

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  103. I know this would be different depending on the paint, etc., but what pressure did you set on the gun and the air compressor?

    (I bought the gun you had great luck with... It is not working well for me as I get a lot of paint spitting. I even tried thinning it out.. No biggie though, as I just back rolled with a small foam roller with good results.)

    Thanks - Brian

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  104. These look awesome!! You've inspired me to do the same in my kitchen!!!
    Thank you!
    Lisa

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  105. Mmmm... I never thought of painting the cabinets to renew my kitchen! This is definitely cheaper than replacing them all! I'm gonna try this some time soon. And I may use that for the bathroom as well ;)

    Thanks for the inspiration!

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  106. what a wonderful post!! Your the bomb! If I ever want to try this your my guide. Thanks for the great detailed info.

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  107. Your kitchen is beautiful! What type of coutertops do you have? I love them!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for the kind comment. As for the countertops - they're granite, but I'm not sure what the color is on them since they are original to the house.

      Delete
  108. I love your hardware...where did you find it. I have been looking for some like yours.

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  109. I went quickly through your tutorial and posts, so please excuse me if I'm repeating an already asked question. This tutorial is amazing. I have maple cabinets throughout my house (except for my kitchen which I had totally replaced with cherry), so I was so excited to see that yours were maple too with such wonderful results. Was this the first time you had used a sprayer? Your results were so professional. I'm just wondering what the learning curve is for a paint sprayer.

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    Replies
    1. This is the first time I used the sprayer, and it's not a difficult learning curve. I would suggest practicing on some cardboard, experimenting with the different settings until you feel comfortable. But, it's really very easy once you get going. :-)

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  110. Wow, you really covered it all! Thank you so much for this!!

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  111. Thank you for answering my first question so quickly. I've been doing some research myself and am trying to figure out how to paint the faces of my cabinet boxes which are I believe melamine with edge banding. My cabinets are frameless which if I understand that term, means that only a hint of my boxes show when the cabinets are closed. I want to go from a light natural finish to a black similar to your island. Did you ever in your research hear how to paint the edge banding which is not a natural wood surface? I haven't found anything yet. Just thought I would ask.

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  112. Jenny, Thank you for the thorough description, I can't wait to try it out. I would love more info about the hardware you chose. Where did you purchase it? I have been looking for something just like what you have.

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  113. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  114. Wow, what a job! You're cabinets look amazing! Thick article, I didn't have to look up anything else on paint sprayers because you were so thorough! Thank you!

    Have you had any experience with this sprayer (http://www.paintzoom.com/)? I know lots of people have said good things about it, just curious if you have used it before? Thanks again!

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  115. Hi Anonymous,

    Are you actually interested in using PaintZoom? If so, please reply to this comment. Would love to send a sample if you would like to review it on your personal blog. The same goes for the owner of this site. Thanks!

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  116. Paintzoom... You posted a question, and then answered it yourself just minutes later... I am pretty sure my 8 year old could have figured that out. I would say this is all we need to know about Paintzoom. The Wagner HVLP Control Spray Max gets good reviews at amazon. I personally prefer an airless sprayer with cabinets because I think you get a smoother finish, but they are harder to work and create more overspray. With the self leveling of the Advance, the HVLP would probably be fine.

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  117. as a kitchen designer that dislikes painted cabinets, I really loved your cabinets before, i would only have changed out your back splash because of it's similar color to your counter (which i love as it's very close to mine) and floor, but a great tutorial for my in-laws 40 year old dark cabinets if i can't talk them into just getting new doors

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  118. I love your cabinets, unfortunity I don't live near a BM store, so I am probably going with SW pro classic westhighland white, wish me luck. I have debated over Valspar and the new Behr ultra, but more people are using SW and BM over the V and B. Jenny I like your black island, can you please tell us the paint and detailed steps you took. Was it just black paint and destressing?

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  119. Bought the paint sprayer, sanded the cabinets, ready to paint and my compressor breaks! Looking for a new/used one now. Can you tell me how many CFM @ 40 psi and at 90 psi your compressor sprayed? If you don't know and can just tell me the brand and model number I can look it up. I'm finding that there is a huge difference and that tank size (yours is 6 gallons) and max psi (you stated yours is 150 psi) really aren't the measure, but H.P. and CFM instead. I just want to make sure I get enough power without going overboard. Thanks for your response!

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  120. Hi Jenny! Great job! I have spent the last week researching how to professionally paint cabinets, and without a doubt yours are the best I've seen! I have high quality solid oak, custom built by the previous owners. But I am so tired of oak! My kitchen is huge, but seeing your work, I have hope! My question, I like the off white cabinets with a walnut glaze. Do you know how your process would change to include a glaze? Thank you!

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  121. Thanks for the information about Paint Kitchen Cabinets and professional painter wa through your blog comments.

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  122. I love your kitchen and really appreciate the step by step instructions for painting the cabinets. Your tutorial gave me the courage to spray my own cabinets in the garage. I have primed them and painted one coat on the back of the cabinets and was just wondering how long you have to let them dry before you can turn them over to paint the other sides. This is such a tim-consuming project, but I keep reminding myself how good it will look. I just look at your pictures whenever I'm feeling frazzled! Thanks again.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Julie! What are you resting your cabinets on while they dry? If you have them elevated on nails or something like I showed in my tutorial, you can flip them after a 24 hour drying time. Can you give me additional details if your painting set up is different?

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  123. Your kitchen is amazing! We are tackling our cabinets right now. We have primed and applied 1 coat of the Advance paint, and I feel like the sheen is really dull. Were yours like that before you put more coats of paint on? Or does it get better as it cures and dries?

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  124. Thats a lot of detail there, good one.

    You can stack the doors against each other upright like a concertina, saves lot of space and being upright dust cant really settle on the paintwork.

    Thin screw driver through the hole where the handle goes, another trick for moving doors without having to touch them.

    Wish we had BM paints here, would like to try them, although need to be careful with white hybrid oil paints, as they are still prone to yellow.

    As you say, labeling pretty important.

    Have fun.

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  125. Looks great with a lot of good information. Much more of a job than I want to tackle!

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  126. Those white kitchen cabinets look absolutely GREAT. It looks like a completely different kitchen. Amazing...

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  127. Asking the cabinetmaker to make the sides of the cabinets from engineered wood can reduce the price. Plus, cabinet shops will often sell discounted cabinets if the contract for the home for which they are ordered falls through.

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  128. Wow! This sure looks like such an intense project! But I really LOVE how they turned out! I can't believe they turned out so perfect! I especially love the white cabinets! I have really been looking into kitchen cabinets rocklin ca to get an update! But I sure do love the idea of painting!

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  129. Hello, they are absolutely beautiful. You did a great job!

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  130. Your kitchen cabinets turned out beautiful! All that hard work paid off. Love it! This makes me want to give a cabinets a serious makeover!

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  131. This is my 1st visit~I am completely inspired!! My Cottage Care home based business involves a GREAT variety of jobs. I hate waste.. need I say more? Fabulous job!!

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  132. I'm currently repainting my kitchen cabinets thanks to your tutorial. I am wondering if you considered using a sealant or gloss (like Minwax) after painting to avoid it feeling like paint (chalky, etc). I'm considering it, but haven't found anyone who has so am asking if you did research on that?

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  133. I love your cabinets, you did a outstanding job, I am very handy and I am going to tackle my kitchen cabinets, I have ordered the HVLP sprayer and I have picked out my colors and I am ready, except for my compressor. I know you said you had a 6-gal 150 psi but could you please tell me what is the Horse Power. The gentlemen from gleempaint said it has to be 2HP but I can not find a pancake with 2hp. I found the Porter 6 gal, 150 psi. Is that what you have? Thank you in advance for your reply.

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  134. I love the way they look. Im now thinking if i will choose that style.

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  135. Comprehensive and well presented guide, thanks for that, yours is one of the best in kitchen cabinetry.

    kitchen cabinets vancouver

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  136. Love your detailed instructions and photos! Did you use Floetrol (or another additive/thinner) with the Advance paint? I'm questioning the thickness of the paint when using the Wagner Gun of Awesomeness to get a super-smooth finish. Thanks for your help and inspiration in finally tackling my 90s oak kitchen cabinets. Ready for change!

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  137. well worked...something interesting

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  138. Thanks, will bookmark so I can find it right away when the time comes to paint my kitchen! Your kitchen looks great! I am curious to know why you chose not to paint the island?

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    Replies
    1. The island was originally a stained wood finish, but I opted to paint it black for a contrast against the white cabinets. I'm really happy with it, and I like the interest it brings. :-)

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  139. Thanks for the informative post! I just got my sprayer and am about to start my cabinet project. One question for you- did you purchase the #4 projector set separately from the HVLP gun? There was a note in my box saying you needed to buy that part to spray latex based paints. Also, how much did you thin your paint? Your help is much appreciated!! Thanks! Cabinets are beautiful!!

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  140. They are a great way to save big when remodeling or working with new construction. However, there are other factors just as important as getting kitchen cabinets wholesale when your budget is tight.


    Kitchen Cabinets Design

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  141. Hi, my kitchen is looking really gorgeous, after following the steps from your blog. It is looking fantastic!! All your hard work so paid off to have this beauty of a kitchen :)

    Thanks for sharing....
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  142. Hey Jenny - Great article. I'm an Boston painting contractor, and we specialize on interior painting. Working on kitchens is one of my favorite rooms to work on because you can be really creative with colors and lighting. Love your photos, what a beautiful kitchen interior you have there.

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  143. Your source for Sacramento kitchen kitchen remodeling, bathroom countertops and Sacramento granite. Home remodeling, siding replacement, home additions and more!

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  144. I have been wanting to paint my kitchen cabinets for MONTHS! In all of my online searching, your blog/tutorial was the most comprehensive I've seen! I was feeling overwhelmed and uncertain until I read this post. Now I am fired up and ready to tackle my cabinets! Thank you so much for all the tips and tricks! Now...just gotta get the weather here in Ohio to warm up enough to stage my garage as the "Dexter" zone! I can't wait!

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  145. Wow - your kitchen looks amazing!! Thank you so much for this awesome post. I know have the courage to tackle this project. Looking forward to getting started! Enjoy your kitchen :)

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  146. Hi I have been drooling over your kitchen for about a year now! I am about to purchase the Wagner sprayer and I wanted to see if you bought the #4 Low CFM Projector Set, 1.8MM? I saw alot of people comment it worked best for latex paints? Or did you just use the tip that came with the gun? Your insight would be appreciated!

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  147. i hope you answer this. What size air compressor do you have?

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    Replies
    1. I have a Bostitch 6 gallon/150 psi air compressor.

      It also says 3.7CFM@40PSI and 2.8CFM@90PSI on it, if that helps at all. :-)

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  148. I work for a Benjamin Moore store and the Advance paint is one of my favorite lines. I would like to clarify that this not a latex paint it is a 100% alkyd formula water-dispersible alkyd. It is also a Low voc paint that is soup and water wash up. I have used it on a lot projects I normally just use a soft nylon polyester brush and have great smooth results. One tip I would give would be to wash your cabinets first with a degreaser or TSP you should clean first before sanding.

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  149. I am wondering how the paint is holding up now? Just thinking about all my options! Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The paint is still holding up very well and I'm going to be using it on the cabinets I'm spraying for a friend. I highly recommend it!!

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  150. Hi, I was wondering if you are still happy with how the Advance is holding up on you kitchen cabinets? I am considering using it on mine. Thank you!

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    Replies
    1. I'm very happy with the Advance paint, and it is holding up extremely well! I'm getting ready to spray some cabinets for a friend of mine, and will be using the Advance again. The only tip I would offer is to make sure you are extremely thorough with the primer around the areas that get the most wear, and to be careful when choosing the cabinet bumpers for your cabinet doors. If you get some that have any kind of "stick" to them, they can cause a problem.

      But I can't say enough about the Advance paint - it's fantastic!

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    2. Thank you so much for getting back to me and for the tips Jenny!

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    3. Thank you so much for getting back to me and for the tips Jenny!

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  151. Nice Article! Thanks for sharing with us.

    Roofer Hamilton

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  153. Very nice and helpful information has been given in this post. I like the way you explain the things. Keep posting. Thanks!
    Storage Cabinet

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  154. Hello,

    Thanks for the tips. Usually, I do not post on blogs, but I wish to say that this post really forced me to do so! Thanks, incredibly nice article. Thank you lots, I am obliged to announce that your blog is excellent!

    Glass Doors for Kitchen

    ReplyDelete
  155. Your cabinets look great! I just purchased the same sprayer, but realize now I "maybe" needed the #4 projector set. It seems you didn't use it and had great results. What do you think? They also suggest thinning the paint and I read in your comments that you did not. Is that true? I'm getting ready to practice on my laundry room cabinets would love to clarify this point. I plan to use the same type paint/primer you did. Thanks for your help.

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